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HealthCetera Radio

Reporting about nursing: our media fellow reflects on challenges, opportunities

By Liz Seegert

July 6, 2017

In many ways, the state of Kentucky is a microcosm of the challenges in today’s health care system. Tens of thousands of people, many in rural areas, now receive regular health care thanks to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. But delivering that care poses its own dilemmas.

 

You may recall reading CHMP Media Fellow Melissa Patrick’s three-part series earlier this year. Patrick looked into how nurses are meeting the increasing demand for primary care in the community and in schools, at the same time the state faces a serious shortage of qualified RNs.

 

She recently spoke with Media Fellows program director and HealthCetera co-producer Liz Seegert about her reporting, lessons learned, and why full scope of practice matters.

 

Liz Seegert
Liz Seegert is a health care journalist and directs the media fellows program at the Center. She serves as topic editor on aging for the Association of Healthcare Journalists, writes for a variety of print and online publications and coproduces HealthCetera Radio on WBAI-FM. She tweets @lseegert. 

Honoring Pride Month: Repost of HealthCetera Radio: Supporting the T: Not just about a bathroom

By Kristi Westphaln

June 16, 2017

What do a bus, a water fountain, and a bathroom all have in common?

The Trump Administration rescinded President Obama’s Guidance regarding the rights of transgender children to use school restrooms of their choice; many are wondering if this truly is just about a bathroom. Many civil rights and child advocacy organizations are in opposition with the Trump position due to violation of the protections guaranteed in Title IX and the Fourteenth Amendment of the Constitution. Title IX prohibits discrimination based upon sex in federally funded activities or education, however discourse continues surrounding the interpretation gender within the language of federal law. The issue of transgender youth and public school restroom use will be explored by the US Supreme Court this march, however many states have already opted to support transgender youth through local legislation.

Rescinding these guidelines places transgender youth at risk for bullying, violence, and discrimination. Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners  have issued statements about the hazards involved in marginalizing children: Policies that exclude transgender children from existing within their gender identity will have detrimental effects upon health and well-being. When children experience adversity and lack of acceptance, they become increasingly susceptible to a host of challenges across their life course.

Data from  Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law estimates that there are approximately 150,000 transgender youth and 206,000 transgender young adults in the United States. Despite the growing numbers of transgender Americans, misunderstanding persists. Curious? Tune into Healthcetera Radio as Senior Fellow Kristi Westphaln delves into the experiences of transgender youth with Dr. Kimberly Aquaviva. Dr. Aquaviva is an authority on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and/or questioning (LGBTQ) aging and end-of-life issues for the George Washington University School of Nursing.

 

 

Kristi Westphaln
Kristi Westphaln, RN MSN PNP-PC is a San Diego based Nurse Practitioner with a passion for pediatric clinical practice, child advocacy, and nursing education. She has over a decade of experience in pediatric emergency care, with a focus on trauma and abuse. She is pursuing a PhD, and as a senior fellow, produces frequent HealthCetera Radio segments.

HealthCetera Celebrates Pride Month: Luna’s Story: How one health center cares for the transgender community

By Liz Seegert

June 12, 2017

In celebration of Pride Month we are reposting this HealthCetera show produced by Liz Seegert and previously aired in March 2017.

 

 

The American Health Care Act, the proposed Republican health plan, would deal a major blow to Medicaid funding for the states. The Congressional Budget Office projects that if it passes, Medicaid cuts will total about $800 billion over the next decade, and leave 24 million more people uninsured—including many in the LGBT community.

Under the ACA, health plans cannot refuse coverage based on pre-existing conditions, such as HIV, substance abuse, or a transgender medical history. There are non-discrimination protections based on sex, which  include gender identity and sex stereotypes, in any health program receiving federal funds (including Medicaid and in state marketplaces). This also includes sexual orientation.

The Center for American Progress found that among lower income LGBT individuals (making between $15,000 and $22,000 annually), the uninsured rate dropped 18 points since the ACA’s Medicaid expansion.

Luna Hernandez is among those benefitting from enhanced Medicaid coverage. She is a transgender woman who receives care through Community Health Center, Inc. in Middletown, Conn. Thanks to the Center’s Project ECHO program, an education program for safety-net providers, Luna’s care team is knows more about prevalent health issues among the transgender community and understands how to best interact with their patients.

Luna discusses her struggles and triumphs, her focus on staying healthy and the importance of the care CHC provides. I also speak with Wanda Montalvo, PhD, an advance practice nurse at the Weitzman Institute the policy arm of CHC that oversees Project ECHO, about what the real-world ramifications of Medicaid funding cuts mean to vulnerable populations.

 

You can also listen to the interview here.

Liz Seegert
Liz Seegert is a health care journalist and directs the media fellows program at the Center. She serves as topic editor on aging for the Association of Healthcare Journalists, writes for a variety of print and online publications and coproduces HealthCetera Radio on WBAI-FM. She tweets @lseegert.