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Primary care

NP Delivery of Primary Care for Homebound Elderly Threatened by Proposed Medicaid Cuts

By Liz Seegert

July 18, 2017

As our population lives longer with more chronic conditions, an an estimated two to three million end up homebound, unable to leave their homes to receive primary care in a physician’s office.  It means they often go without care or end up in crisis in the emergency department, driving up costs and further affecting their quality of life.

 

There are programs and services that deliver quality home-based care, but they face looming cuts in reimbursement, or even outright elimination, thanks to the Senate’s health care bill. It would slash Medicaid by $700 to 800 million. A shortage of primary care physicians further strains efforts to deliver high-quality home-based care.

 

Nurse practitioners can help meet these challenges, said Denis Tarrant, NP, who runs a primary care house calls practice in New York City. He thinks the proposed health legislation will only make it harder and harder to serve his patients, and others like them around the U.S.

 

“We don’t have the ability to meet the primary care demand without nurse practitioners,” Tarrant said in a phone interview. He’s right — nurse practitioners are becoming an increasingly a more viable option around the country to make up for the shortfall of primary care MDs. Research from Kaiser Family Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and elsewhere confirm that independently practicing NPs play a key role in solving the primary care shortage.

 

The Senate’s proposed cuts to Medicaid threaten not just primary care delivery but also home and community based care for our nation’s most vulnerable, and medically-needy older adults. The only place left to pick up the slack is the emergency department, Tarrant said.

 

The Senate is still scrambling for the necessary votes to pass legislation that will adversely affect tens of millions of people. Meanwhile, patients and families, along with those who care for them, remain in limbo.

 

You can listen to the full interview with Denis Tarrant below or subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.

 

Liz Seegert
Liz Seegert is a health care journalist and directs the media fellows program at the Center. She serves as topic editor on aging for the Association of Healthcare Journalists, writes for a variety of print and online publications and coproduces HealthCetera Radio on WBAI-FM. She tweets @lseegert. 

Reporting about nursing: our media fellow reflects on challenges, opportunities

By Liz Seegert

July 6, 2017

In many ways, the state of Kentucky is a microcosm of the challenges in today’s health care system. Tens of thousands of people, many in rural areas, now receive regular health care thanks to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. But delivering that care poses its own dilemmas.

 

You may recall reading CHMP Media Fellow Melissa Patrick’s three-part series earlier this year. Patrick looked into how nurses are meeting the increasing demand for primary care in the community and in schools, at the same time the state faces a serious shortage of qualified RNs.

 

She recently spoke with Media Fellows program director and HealthCetera co-producer Liz Seegert about her reporting, lessons learned, and why full scope of practice matters.

 

Liz Seegert
Liz Seegert is a health care journalist and directs the media fellows program at the Center. She serves as topic editor on aging for the Association of Healthcare Journalists, writes for a variety of print and online publications and coproduces HealthCetera Radio on WBAI-FM. She tweets @lseegert. 

United nurse voices equal advocacy embodied (part 2): American Association of Nurse Practitioners 2016 Health Policy Conference

By Kristi Westphaln

March 30, 2016

HealthCetera on Thursday, March 31, 2016 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM on WBAI 99.5 FM and streamed live at www.wbai.org.

IMG_3369In March, Senior Fellow and co-host of HealthCetera, Kristi Westphaln,  joined hundreds of nurse practitioners from across the country on Capitol Hill to chat on hot topics in health care at the 2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) Health Policy Conference.

 

In this second interview co-host Westphaln interviews Sarah Marlow, Family Nurse Practitioner and professor of health policy is known to her 8K Twitter followers as @MissFNP. Marlow walks us through why full practice authority for nurse practitioners is a hot topic in health care today. 

Approximately 205,000 nurse practitioners are currently licensed across the United States. Research has demonstrated that nurse practitioners improve access to health care, achieve high patient satisfaction scores, improve health outcomes, and decrease health costs. 

Kristi Westphaln
Kristi Westphaln, RN MSN PNP-PC is a San Diego based Nurse Practitioner with a passion for pediatric clinical practice, child advocacy, and nursing education. She has over a decade of experience in pediatric emergency care, with a focus on trauma and abuse. She is pursuing a PhD, and as a senior fellow, produces frequent HealthCetera Radio segments.